۩ Hospital of the Soul ۩
Paul Cézanne, Pyramid of Skulls, Private Collection circa1901. Working in isolation in the last decade of his life, #Cézanne frequently alluded to mortality in his letters: “For me, life has begun to be deathly monotonous” It is possible that the death of his mother on October 25, 1897 accelerated his meditations on mortality, a subject which had obsessed the artist since the late 1870s, but did not find pictorial form for another twenty years. The dramatic resignation to death informs a number of still life paintings he made between 1898 and 1905 of skulls. These works, some painted in oils and some with watercolor, are more subtle in meaning yet also more visually stark than the traditional approach to the theme of #vanitas.
Paul Cézanne, Pyramid of Skulls, Private Collection circa1901.

Working in isolation in the last decade of his life, #Cézanne frequently alluded to mortality in his letters: “For me, life has begun to be deathly monotonous” It is possible that the death of his mother on October 25, 1897 accelerated his meditations on mortality, a subject which had obsessed the artist since the late 1870s, but did not find pictorial form for another twenty years.
The dramatic resignation to death informs a number of still life paintings he made between 1898 and 1905 of skulls. These works, some painted in oils and some with watercolor, are more subtle in meaning yet also more visually stark than the traditional approach to the theme of #vanitas.
Bernardo Strozzi - Vanitas (Old Coquette) circa 1637
The Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow,

Bernardo Strozzi - Vanitas (Old Coquette) circa 1637

The Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow,

A bit of a random post but some remarkable outfits of ethic fashion by Aya Bapani came to my attention. She is a fashion designer from Kazakhstan who makes her dresses using traditional tajik embroidered textiles, known as suzani as well as embroidered wool felt.

Detail from Ulysses and the Sirens (260 AD), a mosaic found on a wealthy family’s villa at Thugga (Dougga) (Arabic: دقة‎) an ancient Roman city in northern Tunisia. 
In this work inspired from the Odyssey, the Greek hero is seen standing on a boat that is decorated with a human head and a palm branch and that has two sails and a battering ram. Ulysses’s hands are tied to the main mast so that he will not succumb to the fatal charm of the sirens’ music. Ulysses’s companions are seated around him, their ears blocked with wax as described in the legend. Three sirens stand at the base of a rocky crag. They are depicted with the bust of a woman, but with the wings and legs of a bird. One of them holds a flute, the second a lyre, while the third, who does not carry an instrument, is believed to be the singing siren. In front of Ulysses’s boat, there is a small barque with a fisherman holding a lobster, the depiction of which is over-sized. The mosaic has been dated to around 260-268 CE; it was discovered in the “house of Ulysses and the pirates”

Detail from Ulysses and the Sirens (260 AD), a mosaic found on a wealthy family’s villa at Thugga (Dougga) (Arabic: دقة‎) an ancient Roman city in northern Tunisia.

In this work inspired from the Odyssey, the Greek hero is seen standing on a boat that is decorated with a human head and a palm branch and that has two sails and a battering ram. Ulysses’s hands are tied to the main mast so that he will not succumb to the fatal charm of the sirens’ music. Ulysses’s companions are seated around him, their ears blocked with wax as described in the legend. Three sirens stand at the base of a rocky crag. They are depicted with the bust of a woman, but with the wings and legs of a bird. One of them holds a flute, the second a lyre, while the third, who does not carry an instrument, is believed to be the singing siren. In front of Ulysses’s boat, there is a small barque with a fisherman holding a lobster, the depiction of which is over-sized. The mosaic has been dated to around 260-268 CE; it was discovered in the “house of Ulysses and the pirates”

Sir William Hamilton [1730-1806] was a collector and enthusiast of the arts and sciences at the height of the Age of Enlightenment in Naples

This spectacular compilation of elevations, representing a superb collection of Etruscan, Greek, and Roman vases, is the fruit of a collaboration between Lord Hamilton and Hugues d’Hancarville (1719-1805), an amateur art dealer. While working as an envoy to the British Embassy in Naples, Hamilton developed a keen interest in antiquity, visiting the excavations of Pompeii and Hercolano and publishing the first scientific essays on volcanology. His friend d’Hancarville Introduced him to the Porcinari family, whose collection of vases Hamilton purchased in its entirety, and helped Hamilton seek out additional Items to augment his collection. In 1772, Hamilton sold his collection to the British Museum; before the invaluable pieces were shipped off to England (and half lost in a shipwreck), d’Hancarville commissioned elevations depicting the vases in great detail. These drawings were published in four volumes known as Les Antiquities d’Hancarville. Contemporary sets of these rare volumes fetch prices of up to 80,000 euros at auctions because these are the drawings that sparked Britain’s interest in classicism and inspired reproductions from pottery manufacturers such as Wedgeworth.

Architectural reconstruction of the Tholos from the Sanctuary of goddess #Athena Pronaia at Delphi.


In spite of this being the most famous structure in the whole of the ancient Delphi site, no one really knows its purpose. Its architect is recorded as Theodoros of Phokis. A total of 20 Doric columns were placed in a circle to support the roof. Three of these columns and a section of the frieze have been restored.

Allegorical bas-relief of “Kairos”. (Time, Opportunity, Chance).

This representation of the now lost original statue made by Lysippos, carved on pentelic marble in the Archaeological Museum of Torino, Italy.

Who are you? - Time who subdues all things.

Why do you stand on tip-toe? - I’m ever running.
And why you have a pair of wings on your feet? - I fly with the wind.
And why do you hold a razor in your right hand? - As a sign to men that I am sharper than any sharp edge”.

Epigram of Posidippus of Pella

(Greek Ποσείδιππος ο Πελλαίος, επιγραμματογράφος)

Titian, “Danaë receiving the golden shower”
1553–1554, Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg.

Medical physicist and artist Arie Van’t Riet used his knowledge of radiation to invent an X-ray technique that looks deep into intricate beauty of nature.

The artist uses an X-ray camera to capture the skeletal underpinnings of animals and the delicate fibers of flowers and plants.

The compositions are staged (using animals killed in traffic accidents and recently deceased pets of friends, so as not to harm live animals with radiation) in his studio and photographed through an process that uses different intensities of X-rays. Color is added digitally in Photoshop.

Here is Van’t Riet’s TED Talk, where he explains his process:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=SPsRNoUx8w3rP1VF9Sj7XBixT4tRwV5Znx&v=qyYGRX_t8LU

I think I need an English bulldog in my life!

Can we all just take a quiet moment to reflect on how stunning is Kit Harrington in Pompeii the movie… 

Alien’s Daddy, surrealist artist H.R. Giger has died at age 74. His artistic genius was part of my childhood nightmares! Farewell!

How would Disney’s cartoon characters survive in our REAL world?

Well, New York based artist Jeff Hong created this series of images where these characters find themselves in alternative story plots showcase a darker side to the movies and narratives.

The series is entitled “Unhappily Ever After” and truly eliminates the ‘once upon a time’ fantasy emblematic of Disney films. Some of the images are particularly hard-hitting, Ratatoille as a guinea pig, junkie Alice and poor Dumbo were my personal favourite horrors. 

Check out Hong’s Tumblr for updates of this series: http://disneyunhappilyeverafter.tumblr.com/

"The way people treat you is their karma; how you react, is yours…” 
W. Dyer

"The way people treat you is their ; how you react, is yours…”

W. Dyer

The sun-god tablet (Shamash Tablet), form the temple of Shamash, From Sippar, southern Iraq, 860BC London British Museum. 

This stone tablet shows Shamash, the sun-god, seated under an awning and holding the rod and ring, symbols of divine authority. The symbols of the Sun, Moon and Venus are above him with another large sun symbol supported by two divine attendants. On the left is the Babylonian king Nabu-apla-iddina between two interceding deities.

The cuneiform text describes how the Temple of Shamash at Sippar had fallen into decay and the image of the god had been destroyed. During the reign of Nabu-apla-iddina, however, a terracotta model of the statue was found on the far side of the Euphrates and the king ordered a new image be constructed of gold and lapis lazuli. The text then confirms and extends the privileges of the temple.

R.D. Barnett, Fifty masterpieces of Ancient (London, The British Museum Press, 1969)

L.W. King, Babylonian boundary stones and (London, Trustees of the British Museum, 1912)