۩ Hospital of the Soul ۩
"The way people treat you is their karma; how you react, is yours…” 
W. Dyer

"The way people treat you is their ; how you react, is yours…”

W. Dyer

The sun-god tablet (Shamash Tablet), form the temple of Shamash, From Sippar, southern Iraq, 860BC London British Museum. 

This stone tablet shows Shamash, the sun-god, seated under an awning and holding the rod and ring, symbols of divine authority. The symbols of the Sun, Moon and Venus are above him with another large sun symbol supported by two divine attendants. On the left is the Babylonian king Nabu-apla-iddina between two interceding deities.

The cuneiform text describes how the Temple of Shamash at Sippar had fallen into decay and the image of the god had been destroyed. During the reign of Nabu-apla-iddina, however, a terracotta model of the statue was found on the far side of the Euphrates and the king ordered a new image be constructed of gold and lapis lazuli. The text then confirms and extends the privileges of the temple.

R.D. Barnett, Fifty masterpieces of Ancient (London, The British Museum Press, 1969)

L.W. King, Babylonian boundary stones and (London, Trustees of the British Museum, 1912)

Cornelis van Haarlem - The Fall of the Titans - 1588

Cornelis van Haarlem - The Fall of the Titans - 1588

And so tonight I’m having a 3some with Ben&Jerry the #Greek way…

And so tonight I’m having a 3some with Ben&Jerry the #Greek way…

Michelangelo’s “The Dream (Il Sogno)” c.1533 The Courtauld Gallery London.
This work has been described as one of the finest of all Renaissance drawings was the product of Michelangelo’s love for a young Roman nobleman called Tommaso de’ Cavalieri, who was celebrated for his outstanding beauty, gracious manners and intellect.  
Michelangelo had first met the handsome youth in Rome in the winter of 1532 and had instantly fallen in love. Michelangelo was 57, and de’ Cavalieri was 21.
Over subsequent years, the artist bombarded Timasso with love letters and poems. Both reveal a Michelangelo who is vulnerable, suffering, and capable of tenderness, so different to the fearsome artistic colossus often described by his contemporaries. A year after their first meeting Michelangelo wrote to de’ Cavalieri that “while my memory of you lasts I am unable to feel either weariness or fear of death”. In sonnets he declared, punning on the other’s name: “I remain the prisoner of an armed cavalier.”
Since the seventeenth century, the drawing has been understood as an allegory of the human soul awakened to virtue from vice.

Michelangelo’s “The Dream (Il Sogno)” c.1533 The Courtauld Gallery London.

This work has been described as one of the finest of all Renaissance drawings was the product of Michelangelo’s love for a young Roman nobleman called Tommaso de’ Cavalieri, who was celebrated for his outstanding beauty, gracious manners and intellect.  

Michelangelo had first met the handsome youth in Rome in the winter of 1532 and had instantly fallen in love. Michelangelo was 57, and de’ Cavalieri was 21.

Over subsequent years, the artist bombarded Timasso with love letters and poems. Both reveal a Michelangelo who is vulnerable, suffering, and capable of tenderness, so different to the fearsome artistic colossus often described by his contemporaries. A year after their first meeting Michelangelo wrote to de’ Cavalieri that “while my memory of you lasts I am unable to feel either weariness or fear of death”. In sonnets he declared, punning on the other’s name: “I remain the prisoner of an armed cavalier.”

Since the seventeenth century, the drawing has been understood as an allegory of the human soul awakened to virtue from vice.

I don’t need a personal trainer.

I actually need someone to follow me around all day & slap Junk Food out of my hand!

"Splash" the mind-numbingly silly diving show is facing the axe by ITV.

Alas that means means no more HAWT men in tiny Speedos & no more sneaky peaky for Tom Daley… :(

"The Infernal Hunt" is number two of Botticelli’s series of four paintings called The Story of Nastagio degli Onesti. 
Completed in 1483 and commissioned by Lorenzo the Magnificent to mark the occasion of the wedding of his godson, the paintings depict four scenes from the Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio.  The story begins as Nastagio is walking through the forest in despair because the woman whom he wishes to marry has refused him. During his walk, he witnesses a knight leading his hounds in the chase of a naked woman. Nastagio watches in horror as the knight captures the woman, tears out her heart and her entrails and feeds them to his dogs! The knight then begins the same chase of the same woman again. Nastagio learns that the woman had refused to marry the knight and that this series of events will take place eternally as a punishment for both of them — the knight’s suicide and the woman’s rejection. The second panel entitled The Infernal Hunt shows Nastagio recoiling with revulsion as he watches the knight assail the woman with his sword. In the background, we see the chase taking place again.  Clever as he is, Nastagio uses what he has seen to his advantage. He invites a group of guests, including the lady who has rejected him and her family, to the forest to view the perpetual chase and its horrific results. Once she understands the possible consequences of her own actions, the lady agreed to marry Nastagio.

"The Infernal Hunt" is number two of Botticelli’s series of four paintings called The Story of Nastagio degli Onesti.

Completed in 1483 and commissioned by Lorenzo the Magnificent to mark the occasion of the wedding of his godson, the paintings depict four scenes from the Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio.

The story begins as Nastagio is walking through the forest in despair because the woman whom he wishes to marry has refused him. During his walk, he witnesses a knight leading his hounds in the chase of a naked woman. Nastagio watches in horror as the knight captures the woman, tears out her heart and her entrails and feeds them to his dogs! The knight then begins the same chase of the same woman again. Nastagio learns that the woman had refused to marry the knight and that this series of events will take place eternally as a punishment for both of them — the knight’s suicide and the woman’s rejection. The second panel entitled The Infernal Hunt shows Nastagio recoiling with revulsion as he watches the knight assail the woman with his sword. In the background, we see the chase taking place again.

Clever as he is, Nastagio uses what he has seen to his advantage. He invites a group of guests, including the lady who has rejected him and her family, to the forest to view the perpetual chase and its horrific results. Once she understands the possible consequences of her own actions, the lady agreed to marry Nastagio.

A wonderful set of matchboxes depicting the soviet space program, circa 1960ies.

The gentleman who found them on Ebay sells some lovely prints here: http://www.notonthehighstreet.com/partners/inkandsons/products

A selection of the Norman Saunders monster cards for Valentine’s Day*!

*That glorious day of the year when couples pretend to be happy and singles pretend to be sad…

Two paintings belonging to the moralising genre by George de La Tour. 

The first "Cheat with the Ace of Diamonds" (1635) depicts a company of card players. The lavishly clothed youth on the right sits pondering his hand, completely unaware of the fact that the other three are conspiring against him and plan to seize the gold coins still in his possession. The theme can be traced back to the biblical story of the Prodigal Son, in which a naive young man travels into the world and eventually falls victim to the tempting but dangerous combination of alcohol, women and gambling.

The painting’s tension is created by the various gazes that indicate the secret that the three connivers share. Although in fact nobody is looking at each other, their eyes, all turned to their extreme right corners, form the connecting points of a triangle. Similarly, the proximity of their hands symbolizes their cooperation. One of La Tour’s trouvailles is that the cheat looks behind him and tips his cards toward the viewer, thus making us accessories to the crime.

De La Tour’s second painting The Fortune Teller of circa 1630 catches a moment in which a young man of some wealth is having his fortune told by the old woman at right; she takes the coin from his hand, not only in payment, but as part of the ritual in which she will cross his hand with it. Most or all of the women portrayed are Gypsies, and, furthering the stereotype of the time, they are depicted as thieves. Gypsies were believed to have come originally from Egypt, hence their name (Gypsies + Egyptians) and exotic dress. They were often shown wearing cloaks or robes fastened over one shoulder and turban-like head-dresses.

The leftmost woman is stealing the coin purse from his pocket, while her companion in profile has a hand ready to receive the loot. The pale-faced girl on the boy’s left is less clearly a gypsy, but is also in on the act as she cuts a medal worn by the boy from its chain

The whole scene is on tenterhooks. The slightest nudge, or noise, or visible motion, will give the game away. The boy might turn round at any point. The viewer is not the doer of the crime,  but you’re implicated. We are put in the position of someone who’s a handy distraction for the young victim..

The German artist Florian Kuhlmann creates giant detailed collages using digital photos he traces online. I adore his symmetrical apocalyptic visions with references varying from religious iconography to Disneyland rides.

You can download hi-res images of his amazing work from his website: http://www.floriankuhlmann.com/

The Torment of Saint Anthony is the earliest known painting by Michelangelo, c. 1487-88  painted after an engraving by Martin Schongauer when Michelangelo was only 12 or 13 years old. It was only rediscovered in 2008 and it’s now kept in the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas. https://www.kimbellart.org/collection

According to the saint’s legend, the rigorous asceticism practiced by St Anthony in the Egyptian desert  (he lived in complete isolation there for 33 years) allowed him to levitate in the air, where he was attacked by devils trying to beat him to the ground.

The saint lived under a mountain by the Nile called Pispir, (now Der el Memun), opposite the ruins of the Greek city of crocodiles, Crocodilopolis. There he lived strictly enclosed in an old abandoned roman fort for some twenty years. According to Athanasius of Alexandria, the devil fought against Saint Anthony, sending phantoms in the form of wild beasts, wolves, lions, snakes and scorpions. They appeared as if they were about to attack him or cut him into pieces. But the saint would laugh at them scornfully and say, "If any of you have any authority over me, only one would have been sufficient to fight me." At his saying this, they disappeared as though in smoke. The imaginative power with which Schongauer interpreted their assault made this engraving famous throughout Europe.

Giorgio Vasari in his “Lives of the Artists” noted that Michelangelo had painted a St. Anthony after a print by Schongauer, and Ascanio Condivi adds that Michelangelo had gone to a market to draw fish scales, a feature not present in the original engraving. Besides this enhancement, Michelangelo also added a landscape below the figures that resembles the Arno River Valley around Florence and altered the expression of the saint.

Mark Quinn - Chelsea - 2008

Which Super-villain lives in a lair like this?

This infographic by a Californian estate agency features 40 of the most iconic hideawaysof famous villains. Check the picture & guess the movie. 

Follow link for more information on each one: http://frac.tl/clients/movoto/villains/index.html#